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Exploring our world through gay eyes

Thailand culture and UNESCO World Heritage (sponsored)

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Photo courtesy: Tourism Authority of Thailand

Photo courtesy: Tourism Authority of Thailand

The ancient Kingdom of Thailand reaches back thousands of years, yet even today living evidence of vanished civilizations are never far from view. National treasures, the impressively restored ruins enrich the country and are a superb source of historical knowledge. Dignified reminders of a glorious past, aged temple spires pierce the horizon with dusty redbrick ramparts, fringed by manicured lawns and under the watchful protection of monumental Buddha statues with their weathered features.

Uncover classic architecture and artistic styles as you learn about the complex customs and beliefs of these distant civilizations; how they flourished and what brought about their eventual downfalls. It’s a history lesson that no textbook could teach. The esteemed organization UNESCO has  recognized the outstanding value of Thailand’s historic and natural conservation sites and has bestowed six destinations with the coveted title of UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Photo courtesy: Tourism Authority of Thailand

Photo courtesy: Tourism Authority of Thailand

Thailand’s earliest civilization dates back 5,000 years to the little known Neolithic communities of Ban Chiang in the Northeast, or I-san region of the kingdom. Only discovered in the 1960’s, this Bronze Age village and cemetery is one of Southeast Asia’s most important archaeological sites, and is famed for its unique pottery and metal implements.

Immaculately maintained and boasting significant on-site museums, the sites of Ayutthaya and Sukothai are a must see on any visitors list. Centered on Buddhist architecture, the atmospheric and deserted ruins exude a peace and spirituality rarely captured in modern life. Atrracting millions of visitors each year, these former kingdoms are proof of Thailand’s early glories.

Blanketed in dense tropical rainforest, the sites of Thung Yai Naresuan and Huai Kaeng Wildlife Sanctuaries merge to form the kingdom’s largest tract of virgin forest and are considered one of Asia’s most vital surviving greenbelts. Located along Thailand’s border with Myanmar, this enormous jungle canopy is home to an unbelievable diversity of wildlife, that only a few privileged visitors are fortunate enough to encounter.

Photo courtesy: Tourism Authority of Thailand

Photo courtesy: Tourism Authority of Thailand

Having only recently been awarded UNESCO World Heritage status, Khao Yai National Park has a special place in the hearts of the Thai people. Less than two hours from Bangkok, this is the nations’ first national park and is a popular weekend getaway.

***This sponsored article was provided and paid for by Tourism Authority of Thailand***

 

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